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INFORMATION - Putting On and Removing Personal Protective EquipmentTHIS IS FOR EBOLAVIRUS

INFORMATION - Putting On and Removing Personal Protective EquipmentTHIS IS FOR EBOLAVIRUS BUT CAN HELP INFORM YOU and HAVE INFORMAION and GOOD DETAILS.

Wednesday, February 5, 2020



NEW ENGLAND JOOUNEL OF MEDICINETHIS IS FOR EBOLAVIRUS BUT CAN HELP INFORM YOU and HAVE INFORMAION and GOOD DETAILS.Putting On and Removing Personal Protective Equipment List of authors.Rafael Ortega, M.D., Nahid Bhadelia, M.D., Osamede Obanor, B.S., Kyle Cyr, M.A., Priscilla Yu, B.A., Maureen McMahon, R.N., and Dahlia Gotzmann, B.S.N.Overview In light of the threat of Ebola virus disease, it is important to emphasize the use of proper precautions for infection control in health care settings. The routes of Ebola virus transmission include direct contact with an affected person's body fluids and indirect contact by means of contaminated instruments or supplies.1 Personal protective equipment (PPE) is used when there is a risk of exposure to infectious material. PPE is designed to protect the skin and mucous membranes from exposure to pathogens.Health care workers who use PPE to guard against contamination with the Ebola virus must remember these three principles:• Repetitive training and demonstrated competency in putting on and removing PPE ensure proficiency in the use of the equipment.• No skin should be exposed when wearing PPE, because of the possibility of contact with infected blood or body fluids.• A trained observer should always be present when a health care worker is putting on or removing PPE, to identify and immediately address any breaches in protocol. The use of a checklist is recommended to document the correct sequence of steps in putting on or taking off PPE.2This review demonstrates one procedure that will minimize the risk of exposure to infectious material when putting on and removing PPE.





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